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Monthly Archives: January 2017

Simple Planter Box

Expert tip: Always draw a diagram before you build anything. Remember: If you can’t draw it, you can’t build it! You don’t have to be Leonardo Divinci, just that YOU can read it!! Your diagram will be useful in helping you determine the size of your project and the amount of lumber you’ll need. Simply take the finished diagram with you when you go shopping, and you’ll be sure to get everything your project requires.

Materials:

Four Lengths of 26 Inch 1×2 Cedar

Four Lengths of 13 Inch 1×2 Cedar

Twelve Side & End Panels 5 ½ Inches x 12 ¼

Two Base Panels 1 Inch x 6 Inches x 24 Inches

Wood glue

Galvanized nails

Hammer

Stainless-steel or Ceramic Coated Screws

Drill driver and bits

Speed square

Note: All our sections were precut, so they just need assembly. If you can’t or don’t wish to cut your own lumber, home-supply stores will generally cut it for you for a small fee.

Expert tip: Before you begin hammering, use sandpaper to rough up the striking surface of your hammer. Then it’s less likely to slip while you’re working.

Building the Frames

Build the top and bottom frames out of the 1×2 cedar strips. You’ll be butting the ends together, so no mitering will be necessary.

1.Fasten two 26″ strips to two 13″ strips to form each rectangular frame. (You’ll need to ensure that the length remains 26″; to do this, butt the ends of the shorter strip against the longer strips. The thickness of the two longer strips will add an inch to each end of the shorter strips, increasing their length to 16″. Do this at each end of the longer strips to form a rectangular frame 26″ long and 16″ wide.)

2. Apply a bead of wood glue to the junctions of the strips; then nail together with a single nail in each junction in preparation for inserting screws to hold them more securely.

3. Predrill the ends prior to screwing them together; this helps keep the ends from splitting. Then insert a screw in each corner.

Attaching the Side Panels

1. Stand the two frames on their sides and apply a bead of wood glue to the inside face of the bottom side frames (the long sides).

2. Attach four side panels to each long side, smooth sides out, and nail from the inside to hold them in place. Make sure the frames are flush with the panel ends on at least one side, or the bottom panels won’t fit properly. If the panels are jagged on the other side, you can always smooth them with a trim saw later.

Tip: Because you’re nailing from the inside, you may have to drive the nails at a slight angle. The advantage of this is that it conceals the nailheads from the exterior face of the window box.

3. Repeat step 2 on the other side of the box.

Attaching the End Panels

1. Stand the half-completed box on its end and apply a bead of wood glue to the inside face of the bottom end frames.

2. Attach two panels to each end in the same manner that you used to attach the side panels, once again ensuring that the ends are flush on the bottom.

3. Repeat the process on the opposite end.

Attaching the Bottom Panels

1. Check and if necessary adjust your box for square.

2. Attach three bottom panels to form the base of the planter box, using wood glue and screws. The base will reinforce and brace the box.

3. Drill several holes in the panels so that water can escape, or simply leave a gap between the panels.

Tips Weed Control

Manual uprooting of weeds is extremely difficult and it would be unfair to say that it can completely be eliminated from the roots.

Another method is Chemical Control-Herbicides are most commonly used to manage land and water plants. It is apparently the only and best possible method of completely removing the weeds from the roots. Many variety of herbicides are available in the market that can be used to treat the simplest kind of weed to the harshest ones. These chemicals are often easy to apply and can be done as prescribed on its leaflet.

Another advantage is that you can remotely or conservatively use it as per your need and depending on the nature of the weed that needs to be treated. However, its treatment involves lot of implications as one needs to keep in mind the aquatic species that thrive inside the pond as they could get affected if too much quantity of chemical is applied.

Water treated with herbicides can have water use restrictions depending on the specific application.

Herbicide treatment should be undertaken in presence of some expert practitioner or field expert to ensure optimal results.

Some of the Common Aquatic Plant Herbicides can be notified as follows:

Harvester, Fluridone Aquacide Pellets, Cutrine Plus, Shore Klear, Aquathol Super K and Hydrothol are the most common treatment options.

Fluridone and Aquacide Pellets are two of the safest herbicides to be used in fish ponds. Shore Klear is best known for control of majority of weeds like cattail, rushes, reeds, smartweeds, and in floating plants like water lily and lotus. This chemical is usually applied to the plant directly and not to the water. Aquacide Pellets work great for Milfoil, Coontail, and all other broadleaf weeds.

Other chemicals or herbicides like Diquat are most effective in treating emergent weeds. One needs to wait for a period of 14-days or so before this treated water can be used for livestock consumption, drinking or crop irrigation.

It’s extremely imperative to know what the most suitable time for its application is:

First when the weeds are actively growing, during early spring, when the water is cool and at the time when the decaying of weeds is very slow.

Typically, treating on a calm sunny morning works ideal.

Plants that Clean the Air

One of the ways we can change this predicament is to become knowledgeable about and responsive to the environment that we live and breathe in. Foliage plants give us the opportunity to not only provide the calming influences of nature in our homes and workplaces, but also provide us with the oxygen we need to live. In a study conducted by N.A.S.A., researchers found that plants also clean the air inside our homes, buildings, and offices. The sources of chemical emissions that cause indoor air pollution include: acetone, alcohols; ammonia; benzene; chloroform; formaldehyde; and xylene.

These chemicals are found in cosmetics, nail polish remover, office correction fluid, pre-printed paper forms, adhesives, carpeting, caulking compounds, ceiling tiles, floor coverings, paints, particleboard, stains, varnishes, cleaning products, electrophotographic printers, microfiche developers, photocopiers, photography supplies, plastics, spot removers, solvents, tobacco smoke, wall coverings, carpet glue, draperies, fabrics, facial tissues, furniture made from preserved wood, gas stoves, grocery bags, paper towels, permanent-press clothing, plywood, upholstery, computer VDU screens, and community water supplies that add chloroform to chlorinated tap water.

Researchers have discovered the most effective plants are: Aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis) – removes chemical vapours; Arrowhead vine (Syngonium podophyllum) – removes chemical vapours; Azalea (Rhododendron simsii hybrids) – removes chemical vapours; Boston fern (Nephrolepis exaltata ‘Bostoniensis’) – the best fern for removing air pollutants; Chinese evergreen (Aglaonema modestum) – removes chemical vapours; Christmas cactus (Schlumbergera ‘Bridgesii’) – removes chemical vapours; Cyclamen (Cyclamen persicum) – removes chemical vapours; Dracaena (Dracaena deremensis ‘Janet Craig’) – best of the dracaenas for removing chemical toxins from the indoor environment; Dracaena (Dracaena deremensis ‘Warneckii’) – especially effective for the removal of benzene; Dracaena (Dracaena marginata) – among the best plants for removing xylene; Dracaena (Dracaena fragrans ‘Massangeana’) – especially effective at removing air toxins such as formaldehyde; English ivy (Hedera helix) – particularly effective at removing formaldehyde; Florist’s mum (Chrysanthemum x morifolium) – one of the best flowering or seasonal plants for removing formaldehyde, benzene, and ammonia from the atmosphere; Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) – removes chemical vapours; Miniature date palm (Phoenix roebelinii) – one of the best palms for removing indoor air pollutants, especially effective for the removal of xylene; Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum wallisii) – excels in the removal of alcohol, acetone, benzene, and formaldehyde; Red emerald philodendron (Philodendron erubescens) – one of the best philodendrons for removing indoor air pollutants; Snake plant (Sansevieria trifasciata) – good for removing chemical vapours; Spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum ‘Vittatum’) – effective for removing indoor air pollutants as well as chemical vapours; and Wax begonia (Begonia semperflorens) – good for removing chemical vapours.

Durable Wooden Swing

You can place a wooden swing in your favorite spot of your flower garden, on your porch, overlooking a pond or just simply place it in your back yard. No matter where you decide to put it, a wooden swing will enhance your outdoor space and may quickly become the favorite spot in the house.

And there are so many different wooden swings to choose from that you are sure to find one to perfectly match your personality, budget and existing décor. You can choose from several different styles including Nantucket, Cottage, Adirondack and Rustic, just to name a few. You can also have your choice of several different types of premium, durable wooden materials including teak, cypress, pine and cedar.

Take for instance the Sheraton porch swing crafted by Kingsley-Bate. Hand carved from Javanese teak wood in the ageless, romantic 18th century style, this wooden swing is breathtaking in its exquisite beauty. This particular wooden swing is assembled with precise mortise and tenon joinery, and will provide your family with a comfortable place to relax for decades to come.

Since the Sheraton porch swing is constructed with teak, it is extremely durable. Teak, a hard strong durable yellowish-brown wood, grows in the region of Southeast Asia and is harvested from the surrounding forests and teak plantations by the locals. The wood of the teak tree is naturally resistant to insects, warping, splintering and the elements, which makes it an ideal wood for creating outdoor furniture.

If you prefer something a little more classic in design, perhaps the Nantucket porch swing would be your best bet. This wooden swing features heavy construction and heavily scaled pieces crafted from Southern Yellow Pine. In addition to a natural finish, there are 28 color finish options available with the Nantucket porch swing which includes eye-catching colors such as lime, mauve and canary or more sedate colors such as sunny yellow, island green and white. You can also choose from several finish options such as natural, pristine, washed and distressed.